Projects

Biolocomotion in Fluids

Biolocomotion in Fluids

 
We examine aspects of underwater locomotion such as deformation kinematics, wake modes, efficiency, and stability of motion. Our approach is to use analytically/computationally tractable low-order models.

Collective motion

Collective motion

 

Collective motion is observed over a wide range of organisms from the schooling of fish to the suspension of motile bacteria. We are developing a class of low-order models that capture the far-field dipolar effect of self-propelled organisms. Interestingly, but perhaps not surprisingly, the dipolar far-field effect is descriptive of both the far-field effect of self-propelled bodies in potential flow (e.g., large fish) as well as of self-propelled bodies in Hele-Shaw cells (e.g., bacteria in confined geometries).

 

 

Biological Flows: Bacterial Colonization of Ciliated Epithelia

Biological Flows: Bacterial Colonization of Ciliated Epithelia

 
This collaborative study examines the role of fluid flow in the transport, encounter and engagement of specific bacterial types with ciliated epithelia. The research objectives are to reveal the  essential processes that define bacterial-host(ciliated epithelia) interactions in health and disease.

 

Collaborators: Janna Nawroth, John DabiriMargaret Mcfall-Ngai

 

Biological Flows: Circulating Tumor Cells

Biological Flows: Circulating Tumor Cells

 
This collaborative study aims at examining the role of fluid flow in the intravasation of cancer cells from a primary tumor site into adjacent blood vessels, their transport by the bloodstream, and their extravasation at a secondary site which is believed to play a fundamental role in the metastatis process.

 

Collaborator: Paul K. Newton

 

Vortices and wakes

Vortices and wakes

 
We use nonlinear dynamics tools and low-order models such as the point vortex model and the Multi-Gaussian vortex model to investigate fundamental questions in vortex mergers, vortex equilibria, interaction of multiple wakes, wake-body interactions, etc

Geometric mechanics

Geometric mechanics

 
Our work on this topic is two-fold: on one hand, we use tools from continuous geometric mechanics to formulate problems in solid-fluid interactions (e.g., geometric phases in swimming in potential flow). On the other hand, we use and develop tools in discrete geometric mechanics for computational purposes (e.g., discrete fluids and variational integrators).

 

Collaborators: Mathieu Desbrun, Joris Vankerschaver and the late Jerrold E. Marsden
 

Experimental lab

Experimental lab

 
We recently established an experimental lab that aims at developing “bench-top” type experiments to investigate problems in solid-fluid interactions. Our first experiment focuses on the interplay between probability and physics in the falling coin problem.